More previews of this year’s Forgeries@Froggwell show!

I’m very excited about this year’s show, and not just because my major painting is not yet done!  (And I know I’m not the only one!)

Linnane Armstrong, who was one of our guest artists at the Froggwell Biennale last year, has completed work on two wonderful woodblock prints for this show. Here’s what Linnane had to say about her work:

For this years Froggwell forgeries show, I chose to make two woodblock prints from the school of… early 20th century American women block printers influenced by Japonisme/Japanese aesthetics. 

High skies Harvest //  woodblock print// Linnane Armstrong// all rights reserved

High Skies Harvest // woodblock print// Linnane Armstrong// all rights reserved

Frances H. Gearhart’s prints capture the landscapes of the western United States. I love her use of rich color and patterns with a distinct Arts & Crafts Movement style. I created a seven-block print, “High Skies Harvest,” of a landscape scene from Coupeville, using stylistic references to Gearhart’s “High Skies” print. To view the original, go to: http://www.francesgearhart.com/
Hotaru Moon // Linnane Armstrong //woodblocks //all rights reserved

Hotaru Moon // Linnane Armstrong //woodblocks //all rights reserved

Many of Bertha Lum’s early woodblock prints are soft night scenes with glowing details. I designed “Hotaru Moon” based on these elements and some childhood memories of catching fireflies. Lum had studied woodblock printing in Japan and many of her works were of Japanese scenes and folklore. Follow this link if you would like to see one of the pieces I studied by Bertha Lum; http://www.bertha-lum.org/details_oeuvre.asp?numero=1217&rubrique=Woodblock%20prints%20(Estampes)

I’m very excited to see these prints! You can see more of Linnane’s work on her page on this very blog, along with more about the woodblock process.

We are also very fortunate to be able to entice some artists from off island, from Seattle as well as artists from  across the country to take part in our show.  Nancy Armo, from Seattle, WA is exhibiting with the Froggwell regulars this year, as are repeat offenders Karen Trimble, from Baltimore MD and Judy Bates from Roanoke, VA.  Nancy is proving that she has gotten into the spirit of the show, by providing the “documentation” for her works:

Thanks, nancy, for providing us with this vital information on these recently discovered works!

Thanks, Nancy, for providing us with this vital information on these recently discovered works!

Karen Trimble and I met…um… some time ago when we were freshman in college, and ended up on the same dormitory floor.  We were both art majors and both grew up in western PA, and I’m happy to say we are still painting and still friends all these …um…several years later.

Water Spirit by Karen Trimble, after Aubrey Beardsley // all rights reserved

Water Spirit by Karen Trimble, after Aubrey Beardsley // all rights reserved

Trimble's homage to Gustav Klimpt

Trimble’s homage to Gustav Klimpt

You can see more of Karen’ s work here.

I’ll post more in a couple of days!  Less than two weeks till show time.

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About Bob T Panda

I am just your average talking panda. I enjoy bamboo, sleeping... oh, did I say I enjoy bamboo? what about sleeping. And of course, don't forget the cuppycakes!
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10 Responses to More previews of this year’s Forgeries@Froggwell show!

  1. I do like Water Spirit.

    • Bob T Panda says:

      Thank you. That is a lovely piece, isn’t it? Thanks to karen Trimble for including this work in the show.

      • You certainly get around in the art world, I’m waiting for a Mona Panda from you. 🙂

      • Bob T Panda says:

        That is definitely on my list of “The Secret Pandas of Art History” (working title) paintings to forge. Also on the list is “Panda Descending a Staircase” and the panda version of Grant Wood’s American Gothic. I really do have a whole list. Would like to do it as a book with all the “stories” and provenance of the paintings. I had threatened to do the Mona Panda for this show, but ran out of time.

      • I look forward to whatever you come up with, you may realise that I love your artwork. Alas, there are only so many hours in a day – so hurry up and get on with it. 🙂

      • Bob T Panda says:

        and yet, here I am dinking around on the internet….sigh…thank you for the kind words about my artwork. good to know I didn’t waste those seven years in art school. (I do admit to falling asleep in a lot of art history classes, tho.)

      • At leats if you’re dinking around on the internet you are still drawing/painting and dare I say again, doing it well. Cuppycake please. So were you dreaming about Pandas while sleeping through class?

      • Bob T Panda says:

        Still drawing and painting, since I am completely unemployable in any other gainful fashion. I was not, in fact, dreaming of pandas while sleeping through art history class. (not my fault, they always turned the lights out to show slides…) Pandas did not appear till later, other than early childhood pandas, of course.
        Sorry, we seem to have eaten all the cuppycakes over at the panda chronicles.

      • Ah, Panda come lately then, at least you are now a devotee. No wonder those pandas are round, eaten all the cuppycakes, hmmph, good night.

      • Bob T Panda says:

        Pandas have no will power, and are never able to resist a cuppycake before them. C’est la vie.
        And, it is never too late to embrace one’s inner panda.

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